Devils Tower is the first national monument in the United States. We can all agree on that. We can also agree that seeing Devils Tower is more than awe-inspiring. We can also all agree that it's an incredible wonder in this world.

But, if you ask people what they think it's made from or how it ended up in Wyoming, that's a horse of a different color.

What is Devils Tower made of?

That's a pretty contentious topic. Science will tell you, it's most likely a volcano. This makes the most sense considering the way the formation looks. If you go on the comments section of posts about Devils Tower, there are a lot of voices saying it's a tree. The Cheyenne believed that a bear was the cause of the formation, saying that some braves tried to escape the danger of a giant bear and prayed for help. So the formation grew and gave them the high ground. You can find the full story here and other Native American information on the formation.

Below is what geologists actually believe and it seems the most likely. They have four different explanations.

Here are their descriptions of the four photos, according to the Facebook post above.

NPS Photo 1: A superimposed digital drawing of a cylinder-shaped stock over a photo of the Tower.
NPS Photo 2: A superimposed digital drawing of a mushroom cap-shaped laccolith over a photo of the Tower.
NPS Photo 3: A superimposed digital drawing of a volcanic plug and neck stretching above a photo of the Tower.
NPS Photo 4: A superimposed digital drawing of a maar-diatreme crater over a photo of the Tower.
No matter how the formation was created, it's still one of the most must-see landmarks in Wyoming and the United States. As for how it got here, geologists and the National Parks Service have debunked the theory that it's a tree, for what it's worth. Apparently, that theory started as a satire post from a Casper publication. You can read about it here.
So, what do you think? Volcano, bear, or tree?

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