UPDATE: A Twitter account that appears to belong to the suspect in the mail-bomb scare includes repeated attacks on billionaire George Soros and praise for President Donald Trump and other Republicans.

The man was identified by law enforcement officials as Cesar Sayoc, 56, of Aventura, Florida. In linking him to the Twitter account, The Associated Press noted that it contains imagery that mirrored what appeared on the side of the van that authorities seized, in tweets that had been sent long before the explosive devices began to appear.

Authorities have not said whether the van seized in Florida was linked to Sayoc.

The tweets accuse Soros of paying off a victim from the Parkland mass shooting and accusing Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum, a Democrat, of being a Soros puppet. The account also praises Trump and other Republicans.

The account includes anti-Gillum memes, with one including the caption "$500,000 SOROS PUPPET." The Oct. 24 posting includes a photo of Soros doctored to look like he's holding a puppet meant to resemble Gillum.

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FBI Director Christopher Wray says more than a dozen pipe bombs sent to prominent Democrats and CNN were "not hoax devices."

Wray says each of the pipe bombs contained materials that could react and cause a potential explosion.

Wray made the comments Friday as federal authorities announced the charging of 56-year-old Cesar Altieri Sayoc, of Florida, with five federal crimes including mailing explosives and threatening former U.S. presidents.

Wray says federal authorities have located 13 improvised explosive devices that were assembled in a similar manner.

None of the devices has exploded and no one has been injured.

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Law enforcement officers have arrested and detained a suspect in the mailings of a dozen mail bombs sent to prominent Democrats and news organizations.

According to court and other public records, Cesar Alteri Sayoc Jr., 56, has a lengthy criminal and court record in Florida. He has been convicted on theft, stolen property and traffic charges and in 2002 on a threat to "throw, place, project or discharge any destructive device."

Sayoc is in custody in Florida in the mail bombs sent to prominent Democrats. He was born in New York.

Sayoc was sentenced in August 2002 for threatening to throw a bomb in a conversation with a Florida utility representative, according to Ronald Lowy, a Miami attorney who represented him. Dade County court records showed Sayoc served a year's probation after a judge signed a discharge certificate in November 2002.

Lowy told The Associated Press that Sayoc "made a verbal threat when he was frustrated at a lack of service." Lowy said Sayoc showed no ability at the time to back up his threat with bomb-making expertise.

The lawyer said Sayoc was a bodybuilder then, and displayed no political leanings except for plastering a vehicle he owned with Native American signs.

Court records also show that Sayoc was convicted in the 1990s in Broward County on grand theft and stolen property charges and in 2004 on a felony charge of fraudulent refunds and misdemeanor of tampering with physical evidence.

President Donald Trump is confirming that a suspect in the mail bomb scare is in custody and says he will be prosecuted "to the fullest extent of the law."

Trump, in his first remarks since Soyec was apprehended in Florida, declared that "we must never allow political violence take root in America."

More than 10 mail bombs have been sent in recent days to political opponents of the president.

Trump declared that "these terrorizing acts are despicable" and said Americans "must unify."

But his remarks came just hours after Trump tweeted a complaint that the media's focus on bombs was distracting from Republican efforts in the upcoming midterm elections.

Earlier Friday, law enforcement officers were seen on television Friday examining a white van, its windows covered with an assortment of stickers, in the city of Plantation, Florida.

The stickers included images of American flags, and what appeared to be logos of the Republican National Committee and CNN, though the writing surrounding those images was unclear.

Officials covered the vehicle with a blue tarp before removing it from the Florida neighborhood where it was found.

Law enforcement officials have not said whether the van in question was connected to the Sayoc.